Art and Agenda is due back at the library, so using this as a run-down of all the information I need to keep from it:

The Commercial Aspect:

Artists:

  • Jota Castro, Peruvian-born artist. “…overtly political, utilizing various mediums including sculpture, installation, objects and video to address environmental issues, poverty, social injustice, corporate greed, and inequality. Although politically poignant, the work is not dry; humour and political satire are embedded in his practice.” pg.16
  • Packard Jennings, American artist. pg.30. Interventions and disruptions.
  • Lisa Anne Auerbach, American artist. Knits jumpers: “Thank God I’m an Atheist”, “Keep Abortion Legal” etc into woolen pullovers, very tradtional looking but subversive in nature. “Guerilla knitting”. pg.34
  • Zoë Sheehan Saldana, New York. pg 36.

Quotes:

  • "Political art has doubts, not certainties; it has intentions, not programs; it shares with those who find it rather than imposing on them;it is defined while it is done; it is an experience, not an image; it is something entering the field of emotions, something that is more complex than a unit of thought. Political art is the art that is created when it is unfashionable and when it is uncomfortable - legally uncomfortable, civically uncomfortable, humanely uncomfortable." - Tania Bruguera, pg. 53


The Human Element:

Artists:

  • Conflict Kitchen - John Peña, Jon Rubin, Dawn Weleski. pg.58
  • The Doublethink Project, experiments in public spaces. pg. 60
  • Harmen de Hoop, Dutch. Street art, inteventions
    symbolic attacks on the functionality and order of the city”. pg.70
  • Evan Roth. pg. 78
  • Aram Bartholl, Berlin based. pg.80
  • Swoon, pg.90
lizardvvizard:

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Chaos in Ferguson. Sunday night, part 4
[part 1] [part 2] [part 3] 

Reminder that:
- no, this isn’t over; - no, these aren’t from earlier in the week;- no, everything isn’t alright now; - no, the police haven’t stopped brutalizing peaceful protesters;- no, police haven’t intervened to stop the looting;- no, police haven’t responded to emergency 911 calls for people injured by rubber bullets or children hit by cars;- no, michael brown’s shooter still has not faced any consequences for murdering an unarmed teenager 9 days ago
lizardvvizard:

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Chaos in Ferguson. Sunday night, part 4
[part 1] [part 2] [part 3] 

Reminder that:
- no, this isn’t over; - no, these aren’t from earlier in the week;- no, everything isn’t alright now; - no, the police haven’t stopped brutalizing peaceful protesters;- no, police haven’t intervened to stop the looting;- no, police haven’t responded to emergency 911 calls for people injured by rubber bullets or children hit by cars;- no, michael brown’s shooter still has not faced any consequences for murdering an unarmed teenager 9 days ago
lizardvvizard:

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Chaos in Ferguson. Sunday night, part 4
[part 1] [part 2] [part 3] 

Reminder that:
- no, this isn’t over; - no, these aren’t from earlier in the week;- no, everything isn’t alright now; - no, the police haven’t stopped brutalizing peaceful protesters;- no, police haven’t intervened to stop the looting;- no, police haven’t responded to emergency 911 calls for people injured by rubber bullets or children hit by cars;- no, michael brown’s shooter still has not faced any consequences for murdering an unarmed teenager 9 days ago
lizardvvizard:

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Chaos in Ferguson. Sunday night, part 4
[part 1] [part 2] [part 3] 

Reminder that:
- no, this isn’t over; - no, these aren’t from earlier in the week;- no, everything isn’t alright now; - no, the police haven’t stopped brutalizing peaceful protesters;- no, police haven’t intervened to stop the looting;- no, police haven’t responded to emergency 911 calls for people injured by rubber bullets or children hit by cars;- no, michael brown’s shooter still has not faced any consequences for murdering an unarmed teenager 9 days ago
lizardvvizard:

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Chaos in Ferguson. Sunday night, part 4
[part 1] [part 2] [part 3] 

Reminder that:
- no, this isn’t over; - no, these aren’t from earlier in the week;- no, everything isn’t alright now; - no, the police haven’t stopped brutalizing peaceful protesters;- no, police haven’t intervened to stop the looting;- no, police haven’t responded to emergency 911 calls for people injured by rubber bullets or children hit by cars;- no, michael brown’s shooter still has not faced any consequences for murdering an unarmed teenager 9 days ago
lizardvvizard:

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Chaos in Ferguson. Sunday night, part 4
[part 1] [part 2] [part 3] 

Reminder that:
- no, this isn’t over; - no, these aren’t from earlier in the week;- no, everything isn’t alright now; - no, the police haven’t stopped brutalizing peaceful protesters;- no, police haven’t intervened to stop the looting;- no, police haven’t responded to emergency 911 calls for people injured by rubber bullets or children hit by cars;- no, michael brown’s shooter still has not faced any consequences for murdering an unarmed teenager 9 days ago
lizardvvizard:

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Chaos in Ferguson. Sunday night, part 4
[part 1] [part 2] [part 3] 

Reminder that:
- no, this isn’t over; - no, these aren’t from earlier in the week;- no, everything isn’t alright now; - no, the police haven’t stopped brutalizing peaceful protesters;- no, police haven’t intervened to stop the looting;- no, police haven’t responded to emergency 911 calls for people injured by rubber bullets or children hit by cars;- no, michael brown’s shooter still has not faced any consequences for murdering an unarmed teenager 9 days ago
lizardvvizard:

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Chaos in Ferguson. Sunday night, part 4
[part 1] [part 2] [part 3] 

Reminder that:
- no, this isn’t over; - no, these aren’t from earlier in the week;- no, everything isn’t alright now; - no, the police haven’t stopped brutalizing peaceful protesters;- no, police haven’t intervened to stop the looting;- no, police haven’t responded to emergency 911 calls for people injured by rubber bullets or children hit by cars;- no, michael brown’s shooter still has not faced any consequences for murdering an unarmed teenager 9 days ago
lizardvvizard:

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Chaos in Ferguson. Sunday night, part 4
[part 1] [part 2] [part 3] 

Reminder that:
- no, this isn’t over; - no, these aren’t from earlier in the week;- no, everything isn’t alright now; - no, the police haven’t stopped brutalizing peaceful protesters;- no, police haven’t intervened to stop the looting;- no, police haven’t responded to emergency 911 calls for people injured by rubber bullets or children hit by cars;- no, michael brown’s shooter still has not faced any consequences for murdering an unarmed teenager 9 days ago
lizardvvizard:

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Chaos in Ferguson. Sunday night, part 4
[part 1] [part 2] [part 3] 

Reminder that:
- no, this isn’t over; - no, these aren’t from earlier in the week;- no, everything isn’t alright now; - no, the police haven’t stopped brutalizing peaceful protesters;- no, police haven’t intervened to stop the looting;- no, police haven’t responded to emergency 911 calls for people injured by rubber bullets or children hit by cars;- no, michael brown’s shooter still has not faced any consequences for murdering an unarmed teenager 9 days ago

lizardvvizard:

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Chaos in Ferguson. Sunday night, part 4

[part 1] [part 2] [part 3

Reminder that:

- no, this isn’t over;
- no, these aren’t from earlier in the week;
- no, everything isn’t alright now;
- no, the police haven’t stopped brutalizing peaceful protesters;
- no, police haven’t intervened to stop the looting;
- no, police haven’t responded to emergency 911 calls for people injured by rubber bullets or children hit by cars;
- no, michael brown’s shooter still has not faced any consequences for murdering an unarmed teenager 9 days ago

(via malheureuseandmaladroite)

Aminah Robinson’s website has an app where you can “create your own art”, inspired by her collages. Is this, then, another way of working with found materials? where someone else has chosen what materials you can find, and then limits you to their two dimensionality? where every “stitch” is identical? interesting. These are what I made on the site, anyway.
Aminah Robinson’s website has an app where you can “create your own art”, inspired by her collages. Is this, then, another way of working with found materials? where someone else has chosen what materials you can find, and then limits you to their two dimensionality? where every “stitch” is identical? interesting. These are what I made on the site, anyway.
Aminah Robinson’s website has an app where you can “create your own art”, inspired by her collages. Is this, then, another way of working with found materials? where someone else has chosen what materials you can find, and then limits you to their two dimensionality? where every “stitch” is identical? interesting. These are what I made on the site, anyway.
Aminah Robinson’s website has an app where you can “create your own art”, inspired by her collages. Is this, then, another way of working with found materials? where someone else has chosen what materials you can find, and then limits you to their two dimensionality? where every “stitch” is identical? interesting. These are what I made on the site, anyway.
Aminah Robinson’s website has an app where you can “create your own art”, inspired by her collages. Is this, then, another way of working with found materials? where someone else has chosen what materials you can find, and then limits you to their two dimensionality? where every “stitch” is identical? interesting. These are what I made on the site, anyway.

Aminah Robinson’s website has an app where you can “create your own art”, inspired by her collages. Is this, then, another way of working with found materials? where someone else has chosen what materials you can find, and then limits you to their two dimensionality? where every “stitch” is identical? interesting. These are what I made on the site, anyway.

"Joe Sheehan (1976) studied contemporary jewellery at Unitec in the mid1990s, and since then has worked in carving studios throughout New Zealand and visited nephrite-jade deposits around the world.Joe’s jade and pounamu pieces explore the contemporary relevance and position of greenstone carving, with his recent work looking at the commercialisation of the jade industry and the limitations it places on jade’s potential as a medium for relevant art practise. Joe plays with social and cultural contexts and questions the way we see things, making pounamu and jade objects that speak first about their object status and second about their material.His work has included traditional forms of jewellery such as a necklace made from several hundred precision-cut discs of Russian Nephrite, as well as meticulously rendered ballpoint pens, sunglasses, AA batteries, a working lightbulb, and a pounamu cassette tape which plays a recording of the river where the stone was found. Joe writes: “I feel privileged to work with greenstone. It is so deeply embedded in the fabric of our history that I think almost everyone in Aotearoa has some feeling for it. It’s this significance which offers a unique opportunity to play and reflect on our culture as a whole.” "I am trying to shift my work away from something that looks like it has been slowly worn away by a hand rubbing with stone on the edge of the river, into something that acknowledges the industrial nature of the process and the industry. This interests me because of the changes I am seeing in the tourism industry as well as the craft/art world. It seems to speak of the way that both our country and our idea of identity is developing."In November 2006 Joe was one of the inaugural recipients of the NZ Arts Foundation’s New Generation Awards. These awards, of $25,000 each, are presented every two years to five artists who have demonstrated excellence in the early stages of their careers. In 2008 Joe was invited to represent New Zealand in the 28th Sao Paulo Bienal in Brazil. In 2010 he received an Antarctica Fellowship.”
- Tim Melville Gallery
"Joe Sheehan (1976) studied contemporary jewellery at Unitec in the mid1990s, and since then has worked in carving studios throughout New Zealand and visited nephrite-jade deposits around the world.Joe’s jade and pounamu pieces explore the contemporary relevance and position of greenstone carving, with his recent work looking at the commercialisation of the jade industry and the limitations it places on jade’s potential as a medium for relevant art practise. Joe plays with social and cultural contexts and questions the way we see things, making pounamu and jade objects that speak first about their object status and second about their material.His work has included traditional forms of jewellery such as a necklace made from several hundred precision-cut discs of Russian Nephrite, as well as meticulously rendered ballpoint pens, sunglasses, AA batteries, a working lightbulb, and a pounamu cassette tape which plays a recording of the river where the stone was found. Joe writes: “I feel privileged to work with greenstone. It is so deeply embedded in the fabric of our history that I think almost everyone in Aotearoa has some feeling for it. It’s this significance which offers a unique opportunity to play and reflect on our culture as a whole.” "I am trying to shift my work away from something that looks like it has been slowly worn away by a hand rubbing with stone on the edge of the river, into something that acknowledges the industrial nature of the process and the industry. This interests me because of the changes I am seeing in the tourism industry as well as the craft/art world. It seems to speak of the way that both our country and our idea of identity is developing."In November 2006 Joe was one of the inaugural recipients of the NZ Arts Foundation’s New Generation Awards. These awards, of $25,000 each, are presented every two years to five artists who have demonstrated excellence in the early stages of their careers. In 2008 Joe was invited to represent New Zealand in the 28th Sao Paulo Bienal in Brazil. In 2010 he received an Antarctica Fellowship.”
- Tim Melville Gallery
"Joe Sheehan (1976) studied contemporary jewellery at Unitec in the mid1990s, and since then has worked in carving studios throughout New Zealand and visited nephrite-jade deposits around the world.Joe’s jade and pounamu pieces explore the contemporary relevance and position of greenstone carving, with his recent work looking at the commercialisation of the jade industry and the limitations it places on jade’s potential as a medium for relevant art practise. Joe plays with social and cultural contexts and questions the way we see things, making pounamu and jade objects that speak first about their object status and second about their material.His work has included traditional forms of jewellery such as a necklace made from several hundred precision-cut discs of Russian Nephrite, as well as meticulously rendered ballpoint pens, sunglasses, AA batteries, a working lightbulb, and a pounamu cassette tape which plays a recording of the river where the stone was found. Joe writes: “I feel privileged to work with greenstone. It is so deeply embedded in the fabric of our history that I think almost everyone in Aotearoa has some feeling for it. It’s this significance which offers a unique opportunity to play and reflect on our culture as a whole.” "I am trying to shift my work away from something that looks like it has been slowly worn away by a hand rubbing with stone on the edge of the river, into something that acknowledges the industrial nature of the process and the industry. This interests me because of the changes I am seeing in the tourism industry as well as the craft/art world. It seems to speak of the way that both our country and our idea of identity is developing."In November 2006 Joe was one of the inaugural recipients of the NZ Arts Foundation’s New Generation Awards. These awards, of $25,000 each, are presented every two years to five artists who have demonstrated excellence in the early stages of their careers. In 2008 Joe was invited to represent New Zealand in the 28th Sao Paulo Bienal in Brazil. In 2010 he received an Antarctica Fellowship.”
- Tim Melville Gallery

"Joe Sheehan (1976) studied contemporary jewellery at Unitec in the mid1990s, and since then has worked in carving studios throughout New Zealand and visited nephrite-jade deposits around the world.

Joe’s jade and pounamu pieces explore the contemporary relevance and position of greenstone carving, with his recent work looking at the commercialisation of the jade industry and the limitations it places on jade’s potential as a medium for relevant art practise. Joe plays with social and cultural contexts and questions the way we see things, making pounamu and jade objects that speak first about their object status and second about their material.

His work has included traditional forms of jewellery such as a necklace made from several hundred precision-cut discs of Russian Nephrite, as well as meticulously rendered ballpoint pens, sunglasses, AA batteries, a working lightbulb, and a pounamu cassette tape which plays a recording of the river where the stone was found.

Joe writes: “I feel privileged to work with greenstone. It is so deeply embedded in the fabric of our history that I think almost everyone in Aotearoa has some feeling for it. It’s this significance which offers a unique opportunity to play and reflect on our culture as a whole.”

"I am trying to shift my work away from something that looks like it has been slowly worn away by a hand rubbing with stone on the edge of the river, into something that acknowledges the industrial nature of the process and the industry. This interests me because of the changes I am seeing in the tourism industry as well as the craft/art world. It seems to speak of the way that both our country and our idea of identity is developing."

In November 2006 Joe was one of the inaugural recipients of the NZ Arts Foundation’s New Generation Awards. These awards, of $25,000 each, are presented every two years to five artists who have demonstrated excellence in the early stages of their careers. In 2008 Joe was invited to represent New Zealand in the 28th Sao Paulo Bienal in Brazil. In 2010 he received an Antarctica Fellowship.”

- Tim Melville Gallery

the-stars-like-dust:

"Wayne Youle’s artwork addresses issues of identity, race, and the commodification of cultural symbols with an iconoclastic sense of humour that has become his trademark. As John Hurrell suggests in Australian Art Collector magazine’s 2010 predictions for ‘artists on the cusp’, Youle "… likes to play the agent provocateur who mischievously baits both Maori and Pakeha communities. He impresses with his complexity of thought, relentless curiosity and energetic output … [but] it is the wit and profundity, obviously based on personal observation that makes [his] art memorable. He is rapidly becoming a highly respected commentator on Aotearoa’s continually evolving bi-cultural history." (i)"By being provocative and funny", critic Andrew Paul Wood writes, "Youle is able to slip under the radar of good taste and political correctness, and make critical comment about the sacred cows of New Zealand biculturalism in a similar way to slightly older artists like Michael Parekowhai and Peter Robinson. Youle makes you think about the issue without even realising you are, and that makes him an amazingly incisive artist." (ii)Wayne Youle is the recipient of the 2010 Rita Angus Residency. Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu will present a survey show of his work in early 2011.(i) Australian Art Collector, Issue 51, Jan-Mar 2010(ii) Real Art Roadshow: The Book, 2009”
- Tim Melville Gallery
the-stars-like-dust:

"Wayne Youle’s artwork addresses issues of identity, race, and the commodification of cultural symbols with an iconoclastic sense of humour that has become his trademark. As John Hurrell suggests in Australian Art Collector magazine’s 2010 predictions for ‘artists on the cusp’, Youle "… likes to play the agent provocateur who mischievously baits both Maori and Pakeha communities. He impresses with his complexity of thought, relentless curiosity and energetic output … [but] it is the wit and profundity, obviously based on personal observation that makes [his] art memorable. He is rapidly becoming a highly respected commentator on Aotearoa’s continually evolving bi-cultural history." (i)"By being provocative and funny", critic Andrew Paul Wood writes, "Youle is able to slip under the radar of good taste and political correctness, and make critical comment about the sacred cows of New Zealand biculturalism in a similar way to slightly older artists like Michael Parekowhai and Peter Robinson. Youle makes you think about the issue without even realising you are, and that makes him an amazingly incisive artist." (ii)Wayne Youle is the recipient of the 2010 Rita Angus Residency. Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu will present a survey show of his work in early 2011.(i) Australian Art Collector, Issue 51, Jan-Mar 2010(ii) Real Art Roadshow: The Book, 2009”
- Tim Melville Gallery
the-stars-like-dust:

"Wayne Youle’s artwork addresses issues of identity, race, and the commodification of cultural symbols with an iconoclastic sense of humour that has become his trademark. As John Hurrell suggests in Australian Art Collector magazine’s 2010 predictions for ‘artists on the cusp’, Youle "… likes to play the agent provocateur who mischievously baits both Maori and Pakeha communities. He impresses with his complexity of thought, relentless curiosity and energetic output … [but] it is the wit and profundity, obviously based on personal observation that makes [his] art memorable. He is rapidly becoming a highly respected commentator on Aotearoa’s continually evolving bi-cultural history." (i)"By being provocative and funny", critic Andrew Paul Wood writes, "Youle is able to slip under the radar of good taste and political correctness, and make critical comment about the sacred cows of New Zealand biculturalism in a similar way to slightly older artists like Michael Parekowhai and Peter Robinson. Youle makes you think about the issue without even realising you are, and that makes him an amazingly incisive artist." (ii)Wayne Youle is the recipient of the 2010 Rita Angus Residency. Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu will present a survey show of his work in early 2011.(i) Australian Art Collector, Issue 51, Jan-Mar 2010(ii) Real Art Roadshow: The Book, 2009”
- Tim Melville Gallery
the-stars-like-dust:

"Wayne Youle’s artwork addresses issues of identity, race, and the commodification of cultural symbols with an iconoclastic sense of humour that has become his trademark. As John Hurrell suggests in Australian Art Collector magazine’s 2010 predictions for ‘artists on the cusp’, Youle "… likes to play the agent provocateur who mischievously baits both Maori and Pakeha communities. He impresses with his complexity of thought, relentless curiosity and energetic output … [but] it is the wit and profundity, obviously based on personal observation that makes [his] art memorable. He is rapidly becoming a highly respected commentator on Aotearoa’s continually evolving bi-cultural history." (i)"By being provocative and funny", critic Andrew Paul Wood writes, "Youle is able to slip under the radar of good taste and political correctness, and make critical comment about the sacred cows of New Zealand biculturalism in a similar way to slightly older artists like Michael Parekowhai and Peter Robinson. Youle makes you think about the issue without even realising you are, and that makes him an amazingly incisive artist." (ii)Wayne Youle is the recipient of the 2010 Rita Angus Residency. Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu will present a survey show of his work in early 2011.(i) Australian Art Collector, Issue 51, Jan-Mar 2010(ii) Real Art Roadshow: The Book, 2009”
- Tim Melville Gallery

the-stars-like-dust:

"Wayne Youle’s artwork addresses issues of identity, race, and the commodification of cultural symbols with an iconoclastic sense of humour that has become his trademark. As John Hurrell suggests in Australian Art Collector magazine’s 2010 predictions for ‘artists on the cusp’, Youle "… likes to play the agent provocateur who mischievously baits both Maori and Pakeha communities. He impresses with his complexity of thought, relentless curiosity and energetic output … [but] it is the wit and profundity, obviously based on personal observation that makes [his] art memorable. He is rapidly becoming a highly respected commentator on Aotearoa’s continually evolving bi-cultural history." (i)

"By being provocative and funny", critic Andrew Paul Wood writes, "Youle is able to slip under the radar of good taste and political correctness, and make critical comment about the sacred cows of New Zealand biculturalism in a similar way to slightly older artists like Michael Parekowhai and Peter Robinson. Youle makes you think about the issue without even realising you are, and that makes him an amazingly incisive artist." (ii)

Wayne Youle is the recipient of the 2010 Rita Angus Residency.
Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu will present a survey show of his work in early 2011.

(i) Australian Art Collector, Issue 51, Jan-Mar 2010
(ii) Real Art Roadshow: The Book, 2009”

- Tim Melville Gallery